Prune User's Manual

Overview

Prune is a system for executing and precisely preserving scientific workflows.

Every task to be executed in a workflow is wrapped in a functional interface and coupled with a strictly defined environment. The task is then executed by Prune rather than the user to ensure reproducibility.

As a scientific workflow evolves in a Prune repository, a growing but immutable tree of derived data is created. The provenance of every item in the system can be precisely described, facilitating sharing and modification between collaborating researchers, along with efficient management of limited storage space. Collaborators can verifiy research results and easily extend them at a granularity that makes sense to users, since the granularity of each task was chosen by a scientist rather than captured at the level of system calls.

Getting Started

Installing Prune

Prune is part of the Cooperating Computing Tools. Follow the installation instructions to setup CCTools required for running Prune.

Prune Example Workflow: Merge Sort

In this first example our workflow processes two text files, nouns.txt and verbs.txt which contain a word per line, and produces the file merge_output.txt, with all the words from the input files sorted alphabetically.

# merge_sort.py

from prune import client
import os

#Prune data is stored in base_dir
prune = client.Connect(base_dir = os.environ["HOME"] + '/.prune')

###### Import sources stage ######
# D1 and D2 are handlers for our input files
D1 = prune.file_add( 'nouns.txt' )
D2 = prune.file_add( 'verbs.txt' )

# E1 is a handler for an environment specification. We will deal with
# environments in a further example, and for now we simply use prune's nil
E1 = prune.nil

###### Sort stage ######
# We define the first task, which sorts the file D1 (that is, nouns.txt)
# In the command line, D1 is mapped to the parameter 'input.txt'.
# The return value D3 represents the output file 'output.txt'
D3, = prune.task_add(returns=['output.txt'],
                     env=E1,
                     cmd='/bin/sort input.txt > output.txt',
                     args=[D1],
                     params=['input.txt'])

# Similarly, we define the second task, which sorts the file D2 (verbs.txt)
# Note that in the command line, D2 is also mapped to the parameter
# 'input.txt', and the output is also named 'output.txt'. This is ok, as all
# prune tasks are executed in their own sandbox.
D4, = prune.task_add(returns=['output.txt'],
                     env=E1,
                     cmd='sort input.txt > output.txt',
                     args=[D2],
                     params=['input.txt'])

###### Merge stage ######
# In the third task we combine the files D3 and D4 into the merged output D5.
# Note that D3 is mapped to input1.txt, D4 to input2.txt, and the output D5 to
# merged_output.txt
D5, = prune.task_add(returns=['merged_output.txt'],
                     env=E1,
                     cmd='sort -m input*.txt > merged_output.txt',
                     args=[D3,D4],
                     params=['input1.txt','input2.txt'])

###### Execute the workflow ######
# So far we have only defined the workflow, but nothing has been executed yet.
# Now we execute the workflow locally in our computer...
prune.execute( worker_type='local', cores=8 )

###### Export final data ######
# ...and export the final result into the file merged_words.txt...
prune.export( D5, 'merged_words.txt' )

###### Export publishable workflow ######
# ...and the workflow, complete with the original inputs and intermidiate files
# so that other can reproduce and modify our results:
prune.export( D5, 'merge_sort.prune', lineage=2 )

After running the workflow with:

$ python merge_sort.py

the merged results can be found in a file called merged_words.txt and the file merge_sort.prune contains a sharable package that describes the full workflow.

If you try to execute the workflow again, prune finds the previous computed results, and does not need to recompute them:

$ python merge_sort.py

Working from base directory: /home/btovar/.prune/
Allocating 8 local workers.
.Nothing to execute.

Export (merged_words.txt) contains the following objects...
file: 609507ca8c80d6f30c9df119766a5ac43690cc11 259

Export (merge_sort.prune) contains the following objects...
task: 42d1a7dc8c80af695882031cf8a5651c78d28ca6 sort -m input*.txt > merged_output.txt
task: 49e7ac81c83a6dac1c2a3d538b94c109b30c47d6 /bin/sort input.txt > output.txt
task: 319418e43783a78e3cb7e219f9a1211cba4b3b31 sort input.txt > output.txt
file: 29ae0a576ab660cb17bf9b14729c7b464fa98cca 144
file: 48044131b31906e6c917d857ddd1539278c455cf 115
Export description: pathname=merge_sort.prune prid(s)=48044131b31906e6c917d857ddd1539278c455cf {'lineage': 2}
Export results: duration=0.000000 size=1883 file_cnt=2 task_cnt=3 temp_cnt=0 more_cnt=0

Prune Example Workflow: High Energy Physics (HEP)

The Merge Sort example above did not specify an environment. A different workflow (involving High Energy Physics) uses Umbrella to specify and create the appropriate environment for individual workflow tasks:

The script command to specify an Umbrella environment looks like this:

E1 = prune.envi_add(engine='umbrella',
                    spec='cms.umbrella',
                    sandbox_mode='parrot',
                    log='umbrella.log',
                    cms_siteconf='SITECONF.tar.gz',
                    cvmfs_http_proxy='http://eddie.crc.nd.edu:3128',
                    http_proxy='http://eddie.crc.nd.edu:3128' )

Execute the workflow with this command:

$ python hep.py

Prune Example Workflow: U.S. Census

The U.S. Census workflow demonstrates the scalability of Prune by using Work Queue to execute the workflow in a distributed manner, rather than only executing with the local machine. The included census data is a small simulation of a real census, but could be applied to the real U.S. Censuses if available.

This example workflow differs mainly in the way the execute command is used in the script:

prune.execute( worker_type='work_queue', name='prune_census_example' )

Now, running the workflow script initiates a Work Queue master that will wait for workers to attach to it in order to execute the tasks.

python match_people.py

The following command line instruction is one way to assign 10 workers to the Work Queue master:

condor_submit_workers -N prune_census_example 10

See the Work Queue Manual for more information on ways to assign workers to execute tasks in the workflow.

(The hep.wq.py script, in the hep example folder, runs the HEP workflow using Work Queue after submitting workers to the Work Queue master with name 'prune_hep_example' instead of 'prune_census_example'.)

For More Information

For the latest information about CCTools, please visit our web site and subscribe to our mailing list.

Prune is Copyright (C) 2014- The University of Notre Dame.
All rights reserved.
This software is distributed under the GNU General Public License.
See the file COPYING for details.

Last edited: September 2017